Today’s Idiocies

There are three articles in today’s Guardian – just in case you missed them here are the headlines and a brief summary. They made me angry.

Page 13: ‘Amazon gets HMRC contract after halving its own tax bill

In 2018 UK central government paid Amazon £45.5M for digital services while Amazon only paid £1.7M corporation tax on a declared UK profit of £72M to HMRC for the relevant tax year.

Why is central government happy with this and content to allow Amazon to tax dodge?

Page 16: ‘Only 13 of 91 Windrush victims given aid despite “apology”’

Despite the piety and hand wringing of government concerning the lives wrecked by that same government only 16 of the 91 Windrush victims who applied for financial help have been ‘given’ ‘aid’.

What’s happened to the remaining 78 victims?

Page 35: ‘Arts under fire Universities rail at “catastrophic” plan to link fees to graduate pay’

The Augar report on student fees implies that there should be less spending on arts & humanities degree courses because the investment in such courses does not represent value for money when measured against early career earnings of arts & humanities graduates.

Why is former equities broker, Augar, allowed to aid and abet the further commodification of education where the only value is monetary?

These may be details of the bigger picture but the devil is in them. Though, I am, of course, powerless to make a difference to any of these outrageous idiocies, I can’t help thinking they are emblematic of this stage of capitalism where people are objects, money is god and cynicism is the life blood of the Tory government.

And all this is happening in the midst of the lunacy of the Tory leadership contest after which we’ll be foisted with a new prime minister of a minority government that has no mandate from the electorate.

I have one last question.

Why is the BBC, morning, noon and night, providing a racetrack, where the going is good, for the threadbare donkeys running in the Tory number 10 stakes?

 

Don McCullin

Don McCullin

Don McCullin’s exhibition at Tate Britain is profoundly moving, perplexing, and, ultimately joyous.

The galleries were crowded. I had to go round one room in the opposite direction to avoid two people who, standing in front of the horrors of war, were laughing while happily talking about their recent holidays – were they blind?

I am familiar with many of McCullin’s photographs but in the majority of cases in reproduced form in magazines – it was inspiring to see his own prints made exactly the way he wanted.

By the time I reached the final room – that containing his landscapes and still lives – I was overwhelmed by the dedication and passion McCullin has used over so many years to represent the human condition in the worst of circumstances of war, famine and deprivation. His photographs capture the feeling of pain and suffering and it’s not just because the prints are dark – it’s because he feels, cares, and it comes across in his photographs so that I was nearly in tears. But then there was a moment of epiphany – I’ll come back to that.

What is both perplexing and saddening is that the lessons we learnt when we first saw the images from e.g. Biafra and Vietnam have faded. The men living on the streets of Shoreditch years ago are no different from the rough sleepers that now abound thanks to austerity and the destruction of the Welfare State. We are still responsible for war and the misery it causes – the Yemen and Syria to name but two. I found myself asking what was the point? Maybe the point is that the work exists, it was made, it was, is, true, evidence, and that we choose to ignore it at our peril.

His landscapes. The moment of epiphany. The realisation that in the ‘natural’ world, as rendered through his lens, there is beauty beyond measure.

McCullin has said

“So, there is guilt in every direction: guilt because I don’t practice religion, guilt because I was able to walk away while this man was dying of starvation or being murdered by another man with a gun. And that I am tired of guilt, tired of saying to myself: ‘I didn’t kill that man on that photograph, I didn’t starve that child.’ That’s why I want to photograph landscapes and flowers. I am sentencing myself to peace.”

Maybe the joy in these landscapes, this celebration of life and peace, would not have been so profound without the horror, without the guilt, and there would not be this beauty?

It was one hell of a price this man, this photographer, had to pay.

Thank you.

 

DRIVE YOUR PLOW OVER THE BONES OF THE DEAD

Olga Tokarczuk’s novel is magnificent.

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The title comes from William Blake.

The blurb on the back cover is good but doesn’t do it full justice.

I couldn’t put it down.

There is so much to take from this work e.g. what Fieldfares can do to an attacking hawk; “Newspapers rely on keeping us in a constant state of anxiety, on diverting our emotions away from the things that really matter to us.” And insight and argument into the human condition in the this century and the dilemmas we all face and not just in Poland.

Please read this book

Brexit nightmares

Oscar Wile said, “the unspeakable in pursuit of the inedible.”

May is the unspeakable is in pursuit of the unacceptable.

Corbyn is the ‘acceptable’ in pursuit of what ????

Come on Labour get your act together or are you going to create an alliance with the extreme right believing that catastrophe will bring about a socialist revolution. If you are  – shame on you.

I am a member of the Labour Party

Mayday! Prime Midden May and baying Tory rats

The Prime Midden May’s Tory rats scurry, saliva dripping, smelling blood, flesh ripping, lips licking, chewing, panting with excitement, gnawing, gorging on the destruction of the bleak and abused and deserted and deprived while chanting their failed neo-liberal crap, pissing on the underlings while laughing, feeding in their gilded halls, celebrating, turning humanity to commodity, untouched by conscience, racism peddling, indulging in the fantasy of a great and glorious England past, present and future, as the Midden May, at the wheel, out of control, flops the flaccid juggernaut of Brexit over the edge of the cliff to the tune of baying rats, secure in their sickening self-righteous security, clothed in the glistening armour of ersatz caring while fondling the ermine finery of privilege, daring the burgeoning poor to bite back or eat cake, as food banks offer no loaves and fishes miracles, fostering foreign toxic hate, as the Midden May and her squabbling Tory rats try to demolish the welfare state and privatise our NHS while weeping crocodile tears of austerity as the rich get richer and the poor even poorer.

Mayday! Mayday! Mayday! There is a vacuum. The Labour Party must develop policies, and not just rhetoric, to create a society for the many and not the few.

The Windrush Citizens

Hi Folks

Yesterday Amber Rudd – the UK’s Home Secretary – apologised for the treatment and distress handed out to Windrush citizens turned into victims. Thank you for that – something that never needed to happen!

Many of these victims of racism have been made poverty stricken – Mr Thompson has been denied treatment for his prostrate cancer and therefore his life has been threatened. Even if I wasn’t a prostate cancer survivor I would support him.

I just signed the petition, “Home Office: Give Albert Thompson the lifesaving cancer treatment he needs.” I think this is important. Will you sign it too?
Here’s the link:

https://www.change.org/p/home-office-give-albert-thompson-the-lifesaving-cancer-treatment-he-needs?utm_medium=email&utm_source=petition_signer_receipt&utm_campaign=triggered&share_context=signature_receipt&recruiter=22107025

Thanks,
Go well,
Phil

Yet more discrimination against those with disabilities

Hi everyone

I’ve just been sent this and wanted to share it with you.

Restore the Access to Elected Office Fund

Emily, David and Simeon are from three different parties. They have joined forces with More United to ask the Government to restore the Access to Elected Office Fund which helps deaf and disabled candidates, of all parties, with the additional costs of standing for election.

Petition to Amber Rudd: Restore the Access to Elected Office Fund

We are writing in support of Emily Brothers, David Buxton and Simeon Hart who are calling on you to restore the Access to Elected Office Fund, which helps deaf and disabled candidates, of all parties, with the additional costs of standing for election.

There are only 5 MPs with a disability. There could be so many more if deaf and disabled candidates could compete on a level playing field.

People with disabilities face huge barriers when standing for election. On top of normal election costs, many face additional costs: for example hiring a British Sign Language interpreter or helping with transport costs.

The Fund was frozen and put “under review” in 2015 but we are still waiting to see the results. Now the ‘review’ has taken longer than the time the Fund was open for.

The Fund is effectively closed. For the sake of equality of opportunity, democratic participation and fairness, we implore you to restore it immediately.

Sign here: http://www.moreunited.uk/restore-the-fund?recruiter_id=117967